Making a Difference – Part 2

Making a Difference as a Parent

As a parent building a close, loving relationship with our children is one of the most important things we can do.  When children feel loved, understood, accepted and safe they are able to thrive as it helps build their confidence, resilience and self-esteem, and it encourages them to try to do and be their best at all time.  As we all know feeling wanted and loved helps us navigate life’s challenges as we feel supported. The best way we can make a difference to our children is to spend time with them, talk with them and to do activities together.  In our house we have a rule that we always eat our meals at the dining room table, this way it allows us to talk about what we are up to, share ideas and laugh as a family.  In turn this helps to teach our child how to have caring relationships and open communication with other people like family members, friends, neighbours and teachers.  Importantly it makes it easier for them to reach out to others when they need help. Remember it is important to;

  • Comfort your child when they need support.
  • Be present with them and listen to what they are saying and show them you care about what they are saying and their opinion is valuable.
  • Acknowledge them and help them to identify how they are feeling.
  • Play with them, read with them and above all laugh with them.

Making a Difference as a Teacher

If we take time to reflect for most of us there was one teacher we remember who made a big difference in our lives.  For me, there are a few that I can still remember ……Mr Haydock in Grade 6, Mrs King (a stern, but inspiring English teacher) and Miss Matheson (the slightly heavy gym and physical education teacher) in high school.  Why, do I remember them, what made them special? Before I answer that, you need to understand who I was as a child……..when I was in 6th Grade I was 5’9” tall and a big girl, I was clumsy to say the least, not good a sport and the kids used to call me ‘Gronky’ after a caveman character in a TV series, but I cared about others and tried by very best in everything I did.  When I went to high school, I was just an average student, Mrs King the English teacher helped me see the world through very different eyes and encouraged my love of poetry and reading, she had such passion.  Being clumsy, I was always picked last at sport, was hopeless at gym, I could not jump the horse, I was scared of heights so no good at the beam or high and low bars and could manage a forward roll on the mat some days, but I tried, to my surprise Miss Matheson passed me, in fact, I got 70%, more than some of the kids that could do everything. So, getting back to what made these teachers special, simply they cared about me and bothered to establish a relationship with me.  They did not judge me for what I could or could not do, or who I was, they found my island of competence and encouraged me to try my best.  Due to that they helped shape my life that enabled me to become who I am today. As a teacher if you want to make a difference in the lives of your students, take time to develop a relationship with then, allow them to see you care, be present with them and really listen to them, help them identify how they are feeling, find their island of competence and build on it.

Students Making a Difference in the Classroom

Children need goals; they want to know what is expected of them.  They enjoy achieving, trying their best, doing a good job, having their efforts acknowledge and working together with others to get a job done.  They don’t understand their impact on others, nor how they can make a difference at home and in the classroom. Sometimes I don’t think we articulate to our children or to the students in our class what we expect of them, we just assume they know and have somehow absorbed the class expectations by osmosis.  I think the start of the school year offers a unique opportunity to have a discussion with your children and students as to what ‘doing their best means’.  Give the children an opportunity to set the standards that they want to live by.  Perhaps they could all prepare a ‘doing my best poster’ and present it to their peers.  I know it is not uncommon to set class rules, but rules and expectations, even the ones we place on ourselves can be very different. This year why not introduce the notion of ‘Make a Difference Monday’.  As a class review the previous week  and then decide how as a whole they are going to make a difference this week, either to themselves, each other, to you as a teacher and in the school community.  Remember, this can also be tied to projects or activities you are doing in the curriculum.  This is a great activity to work on as a team; it is setting a team goal and then learning to communicate to achieve this together.  There are endless ideas for this activity. Ultimately, we can all make a difference to each other, ourselves our community and our lives.  We just have to take the time to communicate with each other and to care!

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